AZspot

blue bits. red rocks.

sports

☼   ☼      ☼   ☼
☼   ☼      ☼   ☼
☼   ☼      ☼   ☼
☼   ☼      ☼   ☼
☼   ☼      ☼   ☼
☼   ☼      ☼   ☼
☼   ☼      ☼   ☼

Well, you know, unfortunately, it was a common conversation that I had with many of my friends whose husbands who also played football. And it was all—it was just a code of silence. You didn’t tell. You didn’t talk about it. When you would talk about it, you always started to weigh exactly what’s happening to Janay Rice right now. If it gets in the media, what’s going to happen? Is he going to lose his job? How am I going to be perceived, you know, in the situation? Like I’m tearing him down. You know, when you’re a victim and when you feel that things that are going wrong in your marriage or in your household are your fault or you’re causing it, because you’re made to believe that, because you’re dealing with a person who is a superstar in their own mind, they’re a superstar on the football field, and everyone gives them what they want. And so, you know, when we would conversate about it, problems would come up between the wives, because—we called it pillow talk: If the women would go back to their husbands and share anything that I would say or someone else would say, the husbands would go to the locker room and share it, and then that would escalate the argument and the fight, because then, you know, your husband comes back home and says, “Stop talking to our business. You told such-and-such about this. It’s no one’s business. Keep our business in our house.” And so, it was very difficult, because it happened to many women, both physical and verbally, and it was just—it’s just what happens. Dewan Smith-Williams

A GNT creation ©2007–2014