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blue bits. red rocks.

robotic nation

What happens when half the jobs done by men and women can be done by a robot costing about the same amount as a human is paid in a year (and running on far less in power and maintenance once the first year wage capital is paid)… When most of the citizens can’t find anything that anyone would pay them to do, what does this mean for a Republic? I have asked this before. And I wonder just who is thinking about this now? Jerry Pournelle

…we need to think about the ownership of the machines as endogenous and not assigned by presumption. It makes a big difference to how we think about the long-term effects of these changes and the allocation of welfare they imply. I’m not claiming here that the adjustment will be pleasant. What I claim here is that the adjustment will occur and the long-run prospects for a interconnected rather than disconnected society and economy remain as good as ever. The ownership of the machines

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In my view, warehousing elderly and children—especially children with disabilities—in rooms with machines that keep them busy, when large numbers of humans beings around the world are desperate for jobs that pay a living wage is worse than the Dickensian nightmares of mechanical industrialization, it’s worse than the cold, alienated workplaces depicted by Kafka. Failing the Third Machine Age: When Robots Come for Grandma

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And emotional labor is already greatly devalued: notice how most of it is so little paid: health-aides and pre-school teachers are among the lowest paid jobs even though the the work is difficult and requires significant skill and emotional labor. Failing the Third Machine Age: When Robots Come for Grandma

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