AZspot

blue bits. red rocks.
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But where Ryan and others get it wrong is in their pervasive assumption that all you have to do to get a job is want a job. In this regard, here is what you need to know about work requirements: in the absence of strong labor demand, such requirements are a recipe for more, not less, poverty. And even in strong labor markets, the low-wage labor market is often characterized by weak demand. So the only way I and other progressives should even begin to entertain the idea of requiring work is if there’s a guaranteed job. And by the way, adding a work requirement without adding new money to administer it is a cut relative to current spending. Paul Ryan’s poverty plan attacks the wrong problem and comes up with the wrong solution

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In Japan, you sit on a stool and have a bucket, sponge, ladle and hand shower that you only turn on when you need it. You can sit comfortably for as long as you like, in no danger of slipping, use the ladle or the hand shower to rinse. It’s really a lovely experience. It uses 10% of the water compared to a normal shower. If you do follow up with a hot bath, at least the water is shared among the whole family. Why the modern bathroom is a wasteful, unhealthy design

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A court has dealt a major blow to Obamacare, which, remember, was the conservative alternative originating in the Heritage Foundation and implemented in Massachusetts by the GOP’s last presidential nominee. The right will never quit until it is dead. We are the only advanced nation without universal health care. The Republican message to the poor is: die. Yet a majority of poor whites vote Republican every time. Rogue Columnist: Stuck

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It’s not discrimination when we are prevented from doing the discriminating. It’s not persecution when we are prevented from doing the persecuting. It’s not bullying when we’re told that we can’t bully others. So Listen– It’s Not Religious Discrimination Just Because You Can’t Discriminate.

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In my view, warehousing elderly and children—especially children with disabilities—in rooms with machines that keep them busy, when large numbers of humans beings around the world are desperate for jobs that pay a living wage is worse than the Dickensian nightmares of mechanical industrialization, it’s worse than the cold, alienated workplaces depicted by Kafka. Failing the Third Machine Age: When Robots Come for Grandma

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What Love Looks Like: A CONVERSATION WITH TIM DECHRISTOPHER BY TERRY TEMPEST WILLIAMS

  • TERRY: A while back I was reading Albert Schweitzer’s book on historical Jesus. Do you see Jesus as a historical figure in terms of leadership?
  • TIM: Yeah, I do view him as an example of a revolutionary leader.
  • TERRY: How?
  • TIM: Well, he was saying very challenging things both to the people who were following him and to the dominant culture at the time. And it led to some radical changes in the way people were living and the way people were structuring society.
  • TERRY: What would you view as the most radical of his teachings?
  • TIM: Turning the other cheek, I think, is one extremely radical thing. That, I think, is his powerful message about civil disobedience. And the other, which might be even more radical, is letting go of material wealth. That’s so radical that Christians today still can’t talk about it. I mean, he said it’s easier to pass a camel through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to get into Heaven. And he told his followers to drop what they had, to let go of their jobs, to let go of their material possessions. Even let go of their families. If they wanted to follow him, they had to let go of everything they were holding onto, all the things that brought them security in life. They had to be insecure. That’s pretty radical.
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…I think the powerful thing for me was when I got to the point of looking at Christianity and the Bible as more of a painting than as a photograph … that there were people who had this powerful experience with something bigger than themselves, and that this was their painting of it; this was how they articulated and painted that experience. But it wasn’t a photograph. And there were other groups of people in other parts of the world that had this other powerful experience with something bigger than themselves and they painted their picture of it. And, you know, we might have the same kind of experience, or have an experience with the same thing, and paint two very different pictures of it. Tim DeChristopher

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